Vascular medicine

Vascular medicine encompasses the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the arterial and venous vascular system. Arteries carry highly pressurised and oxygenated blood from the heart to the organs and extremities, whereas veins conduct the low-oxygen blood from the organs and extremities back to the heart. Blood pressure in the veins is very low, so that blood is literally “sucked in” by the heart.
                                           
The diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the arterial vascular system
 

  • Causes
    of diseases of the arterial vascular system:
    metabolic diseases (high sugar or cholesterol values) or high blood pressure damage the vessel walls; this results in inflammation of the vessel walls (atherosclerosis or arteriosclerosis) and development of vessel plaque that can obstruct the blood flow in the arteries (stenosis). These deposits can even block the vessel completely with the result that blood flow through the organs stops completely (infarction).

 

  • Symptoms
    Once blood circulation is restricted, symptoms begin to emerge: tingling in the face through to paralysis on one side, tightness in the chest; women may also experience back pain as a result of circulatory problems in the heart, calf cramps or frequent stops after short walking distances ("intermittent claudication").

 

  • Diagnostics:
    In addition to examination of the arteries (inspection of legs, palpation and function tests), various ultrasound procedures are available as instrument-based diagnostic procedures for examining blood vessels and organs. These techniques are supplemented by radiological procedures such as MRI or CT scans.

 

  • Treatment procedures
    Exercise and weight reduction or nutrition low in fat and cholesterol work preventively for arterial diseases. The treatment of the underlying disease is the priority, supplemented by anti-coagulants or medication to enhance circulation.

 

Diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the venous vascular system
 

  • Causes
    of diseases of the venous vascular system:
    Veins are equipped with venous valves which work like “non-return valves”: blood is “sucked in” with each heartbeat; after the heartbeat, the valves close so that the blood reaches the heart in portions.
    Standing or sitting for long periods, lack of exercise, being overweight, pregnancy, thrombosis or a genetic weakness of connective tissue hinder the transportation of blood in veins.

 

  • Symptoms
    Heavy and tight feeling in legs or swellings, reoccurring calf cramps or inflammation of the veins indicate a venous disorder.

 

  • Diagnostics
    In addition to examining the veins (inspection of legs, palpation and function tests), various ultrasound procedures are available as instrument-based diagnostic procedures.

 

  • Treatment procedures
    Exercise and weight reduction, and elevating legs work preventively for venous disorders. Elastic bandaging (compression therapy) facilitates the return flow of the blood back to the heart and “relieves” the veins.
  • Sclerotherapy
    Using a thin syringe, foam is inserted into the vein, closing the vein up. The body absorbs this unusable vein on its own.
  • Mini-phlebectomy
    Through small punctures in large surface veins, they are gently removed. This leaves no scarring.
  • Endolaser therapy
    A thin laser probe is inserted into the vein; the laser energy closes the vein down – a very gentle, elegant procedure.
  • Radiowave therapy
    A probe is inserted into the vein and heats up the vein, which closes up as a result subsequently shrinks and is then absorbed by the body.
  • Varicose vein operations ("vein stripping")
    A “wire” is inserted into large veins and then the entire vein is removed by pulling out the wire.

We will gladly provide you with information regarding the individual diagnosis and treatment procedures.